Archive for June, 2014

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EIFF 2014: Au revoir l’été (Kôji Fukada, 2013)

June 27, 2014

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Japanese writer-director Kôji Fukada’s excellent previous feature, screened internationally under the name Hospitalité, had a hint of Luis Buñuel to it, and the influence of another European master is present in the similarly French-titled Au revoir l’été. Here, the breezy holiday romances of French filmmaker Eric Rohmer infuse the atmosphere of a delicate ensemble piece set over one summer…

Click for the full review for The Skinny

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EIFF 2014: The Infinite Man (Hugh Sullivan, 2014)

June 26, 2014

The Infinite Man

This Australian film could easily (and lazily) be described as a romantic comedy version of elaborate time-travel works Primer and Timecrimes, or as ‘Looper in love’, but writer-director Hugh Sullivan’s smart and sensitive feature debut deserves special credit for hinging its conceit on successful emotional beats, never letting its structural ambition get in the way of its fun character arcs and some terrific laughs…

Click for the full review for The Skinny

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EIFF 2014: I Believe in Unicorns (Leah Meyerhoff, 2014)

June 24, 2014

I Believe in Unicorns

A merging of Terrence Malick’s Badlands and Terry Gilliam’s Tideland might be read as a possible influence on I Believe in Unicorns, but this very impressive road movie from Leah Meyerhoff (who writes, directs and partially animates some stop-motion sequences) forges an evocative stylistic voice of its own…

Click for the full review for The Skinny

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EIFF 2014: Stations of the Cross (Dietrich Brüggemann, 2014)

June 24, 2014

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Stations of the Cross is made up of 14 segments, each filmed in a single long and often static take, where meticulous compositions and dry performances drive a biting look at fundamentalist Catholicism and domineering parenting, as well as the surrounding secular society that fails to properly intervene when one young girl takes the notion of sacrifice for following God’s will too far…

Click for the full review for The Skinny

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EIFF 2014: Fish & Cat (Shahram Mokri, 2013)

June 23, 2014

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The narrative, as it were, of Fish & Cat is told through what appears to be one long, continuous roving shot lasting over two hours in length, in the mode of cinematic experiment popularised by Aleksandr Sokurov’s Russian Ark in 2002. It employs a time-warp motif for the conceit, doubling back on what it has previously shown, either immediately before or sometimes much earlier in the film, to focus in on new topics. Additionally, while single-take experiments like both Silent House horror features may follow a lone protagonist venturing through a given locale, Shahram Mokri’s film crisscrosses between multiple characters across a fairly large plain, weaving its way through both the present and flashbacks while still under the guise of a sustained real time shot, even as space-time paradoxes become something of a regular feature…

Click for the full review for Sound On Sight

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EIFF 2014: Snowpiercer (Bong Joon-ho, 2013)

June 22, 2014

Snowpiercer

Adapted from a French comic, directed by South Korean maverick Bong Joon-ho (The Host, Memories of Murder), and featuring a stacked roster of American, European and Asian stars, the high-concept sci-fi Snowpiercer is the epitome of an ambitious international co-production…

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EIFF 2014: Welcome to New York (Abel Ferrara, 2014)

June 21, 2014

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Abel Ferrara’s blunt-force Welcome to New York is a thinly-veiled fictionalisation of the sexual assault incident that disgraced former IMF chief Dominic Strauss-Kahn, one that posits its lead as indisputably guilty of the crime. As Devereaux, Gérard Depardieu gives a warts, balls and all performance as a brutish sex addict, whose standing in wealth and power have fuelled a complete removal from contemporary morality…

Click for the full review for The Skinny