Posts Tagged ‘Ernest and Celestine’

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Seen Your Video #32: Best of 2013

January 25, 2014

Side-Effects

On the latest episode of Seen Your Video, Chris Ward and I discuss our favourite films released in the UK during 2013, plus some of our biggest disappointments.

Stream the episode here.
Alternatively, you can download the episode or subscribe to the podcast by looking up Seen Your Video on iTunes.

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Ernest & Celestine (Stéphane Aubier/Vincent Patar/Benjamin Renner, 2012)

December 9, 2013

Ernest-and-Celestine

Based on Belgian author Gabrielle Vincent’s children’s books, Ernest & Celestine is an infectiously joyous piece of entertainment from the duo behind the manic A Town Called Panic, who direct here alongside Benjamin Renner. That earlier film’s stop-motion approach is abandoned for a more traditional hand-drawn animation style, presented in a beautiful, gentle watercolour palette. Ernest & Celestine is also not quite so anarchic in its humour, though one struggles to think of what film could match A Town Called Panic for that, but shares its predecessor’s wittiness regarding heated exchanges and heightened characters prone to snap decision-making…

Click for the full review for Sound on Sight

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2012 in Review

January 2, 2013

2012-in-Review

Number of films seen, excluding shorts: 305
Number of films seen for the first time, excluding shorts: 238

Pre-1920s: 0
1920s: 4 (4 first time viewings)
1930s: 5 (3)
1940s: 15 (8)
1950s: 13 (6)
1960s: 13 (9)
1970s: 16 (8)
1980s: 28 (21)
1990s: 24 (11)
2000s: 32 (17)
2010s: 155 (149) Read the rest of this entry ?

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French Film Festival UK: Ernest & Celestine (Stéphane Aubier/Vincent Patar/Benjamin Renner, 2012)

November 30, 2012

Based on Belgian author Gabrielle Vincent’s children’s books, Ernest & Celestine is an infectiously joyous piece of entertainment from the duo behind the manic A Town Called Panic, who direct here alongside Benjamin Renner. That earlier film’s stop-motion approach is abandoned for a more traditional hand-drawn animation style, presented in a beautiful, gentle watercolour palette. Ernest & Celestine is also not quite so anarchic in its humour, though one struggles to think of what film could match A Town Called Panic for that, but shares its predecessor’s wittiness regarding heated exchanges and heightened characters prone to snap decision-making…

Full review at Sound on Sight