Posts Tagged ‘The CineSkinny’

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GFF 2015: Pale Moon (Daihachi Yoshida, 2014)

February 19, 2015

Pale-Moon

Set in the mid-1990s, not long after the burst of Japan’s economic bubble, Pale Moon follows Rika (Miyazawa), a demure housewife turned bank employee who begins an affair with a young college student (Ikematsu), the grandson of one of her wealthier elderly clients. She starts to successfully embezzle large sums of money, mostly thanks to the bank’s less than thorough practices and her sterling reputation; however, one eagle-eyed supervisor (Kobayashi) has her suspicions…

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GFF 2015: White Bird in a Blizzard (Gregg Araki, 2014)

February 18, 2015

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Closer in spirit to his Mysterious Skin than The Doom Generation,White Bird in a Blizzard sees director Gregg Araki adapting a Laura Kasischke novel and applying his trademark gifts for depicting both the sweet and the sour of adolescence. Beginning in the late 80s, it sees 17-year-old Kat (Shailene Woodley) going through a big sexual awakening while reckoning with her mother Eve’s sudden vanishing, which follows years of increasingly strange behaviour towards both Kat and the husband (Christopher Meloni) Eve seems to despise…

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GFF 2015: Monsters: Dark Continent (Tom Green, 2014)

February 18, 2015

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In the vein of the genre switch-up between Alien and Aliens, Monsters sequel Dark Continent is an action-orientated take on the setup of the more modest original, with road trip leanings swapped for a bigger scope, explosions and fire-power…

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GFF 2014: Sorcerer (William Friedkin, 1977)

March 6, 2014

Sorcerer-Review

A financial flop lost in the Star Wars summer of 1977, William Friedkin’s Sorcerer, long plagued by legal problems regarding distribution in its complete form, has now undergone a stunning restoration overseen by the director himself. Based on the same novel as the French classic The Wages of Fear, it concerns four fugitives whose desperation has brought them to an oil-drilling work camp in South America, thanks to crimes of assassination, terrorism, bank fraud and robbery. When offered enough money to escape their situation, they take on the life-threatening job of transporting crates of temperamental nitrogylcerin by truck across a nightmarish jungle…

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GFF 2014: Mistaken for Strangers (Tom Berninger, 2013)

March 6, 2014

Mistaken-for-Strangers

On the surface, Mistaken for Strangers would seem to be a standard tour rockumentary, in this case following Ohio indie outfit The National during the mainstream breakthrough brought about by their 2010 album, High Violet. Under the lead of Tom Berninger, the immature metalhead brother of the band’s frontman Matt, what one actually gets with this hugely entertaining film is a candid look into sibling strife, creative crossroads, responsibility, and the very nature of the artistic process. Basically, don’t expect a film about The National…

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GFF 2014: Love Is Not What It Used to Be (Gabriel Ochoa, 2013)

February 28, 2014

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In one Spanish city, three couples of varying ages undergo differing experiences of modern love: elderly former lovers meet again after years apart, a middle-aged pair struggle with their diminishing commitment to one another, and a young man and woman take nervous steps into a committed relationship. The three narratives of Love Is Not What It Used to Be are loosely connected by the males of each pairing all working at the same hospital, though the tales never actually intertwine despite gelling well alongside each other within the narrative’s framework…

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GFF 2014: Ilo Ilo (Anthony Chen, 2013)

February 28, 2014

Ilo Ilo (2)

Exasperation drives the actions of the key players in Ilo Ilo, a film that is both a vivid portrait of recession-struck Singapore in 1997 and a subdued, bittersweet affair that retains a natural feel.

When bratty ten-year-old son Jiale (Ler) finally proves too uncontrollable for the over-worked, heavily pregnant Hwee Leng (Yeo), she and her husband Teck (Chen) hire a Filipina live-in maid, Teresa (Bayani). The child spitefully rejects the nanny, but affection and complicity eventually manifest, though the situations for the adults quietly worsen as each keep their turmoil to themselves…

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